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What if teenage girls ran the world? But they still didn’t have any real power? This is an idea explored in a new crop of novels in the ever-popular dystopian young-adult genre. Under the restrictive regimes in Megan McCafferty’s “Bumped,” Ally Condie’s “Matched” and Lauren Oliver’s “Delirium,” teenage girls are the most valued members of society. But there’s a twist: In these dark worlds, the heroines are more likely to be valued for their fertility or marriageability than for their intellect or athletic skill.
(via Teenage Girls in a Dystopian World - NYTimes.com)

What if teenage girls ran the world? But they still didn’t have any real power? This is an idea explored in a new crop of novels in the ever-popular dystopian young-adult genre. Under the restrictive regimes in Megan McCafferty’s “Bumped,” Ally Condie’s “Matched” and Lauren Oliver’s “Delirium,” teenage girls are the most valued members of society. But there’s a twist: In these dark worlds, the heroines are more likely to be valued for their fertility or marriageability than for their intellect or athletic skill.

(via Teenage Girls in a Dystopian World - NYTimes.com)